What I Learned When I Learned

Last year I learned what “hangry” meant. I hadn’t heard anyone use it before, but when I finally did I thought it was hilarious. I was writing a paper on slang and culture, and my argument was basically that everything is a word, regardless of if it’s in the dictionary as long as it is widely used in a general social context for a sufficient period of time so that various groups of people know what it means. I thought “hangry” was a hilarious concept because I realized that I get hangry, but I never had a word for it. I get grumpy when I’m hungry. It’s great that I did find the word because now I can better monitor my emotions: “Katie, there’s no reason to be pissy. You’re hungry. Eat some food.”

Earlier today I read an article about how to make God happy. I just wasn’t finding the clarity I needed on this particular issue while reading through the Old Testament prophets. The person who wrote the article said that one makes God happy by loving. We’re basically told to love everyone–love your God; love your enemies; love your neighbors; love yourself. I want to make God happy because he makes me happy. In the article, I came across the question I’ve been perpetually asking myself: What can you possibly do for the person who literally made and owns everything?

In Church this weekend, our priest talked about what we can do during Lent to become closer to God. I usually try and give something up for Lent. Last year I gave up Facebook, and I think it did me some good. I initially thought I would just do that again because I do think I spend a little too much time on there. However, lately I’ve been a lot more intentional with what I post. I try to be positive, and I often post things from scripture that I think will be helpful for people to hear, so I figured it wouldn’t necessarily be the most productive thing to give up. Then our priest mentioned that instead of giving something up like a bad habit or a thing we value a little too much, we could spend the time during Lent to simply be more intentional with the time we dedicate to spiritual things or with our emotions.

There are times where I can be rather negative. I don’t mean to be, but when I butt heads with someone or spend a lot of time with someone I disagree with, I can think downright mean things, sometimes even for no real reason. Sometimes I’m impatient, particularly when my technology isn’t behaving, even though it’s usually an easily fixable problem. Sometimes I’ll read through posts on Facebook and think: I don’t care, NEXT; that’s stupid, NEXT; that’s wrong, NEXT; what a giant waste of time, NEXT; why is everything so negative, NEXT. There are periods where a lot of posts are negative for whatever reason, but it doesn’t help when I get annoyed at posts about football, even though I just don’t care about football. I invariably get these negative impulses and feelings when I’m hangry. I noticed myself doing this a few minutes ago, so I’ve decided that, for Lent, I’m going to make sure to monitor and, to the best of my ability, shut down unwarranted negative feelings and impulses. I’ve already started, and it’s darn hard. I keep a lot of it in my head, so I never really face any repercussions for it other than I eventually realize what I’m doing and then feel bad. I don’t want to do it anymore because it’s not loving, and I want to love better.

Because in my world guinea pigs can fly!

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