Fences

Catholic or not, you may know that our tradition is notorious for interesting, odd, and inspiring devotions. One that I am fond of is a devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. It was inspired by a revelation of Jesus to Saint Margaret Mary Alocoque. He wanted her to let the world know that what He really wanted was to grant his mercy, but that so many people simply were indifferent to Him and would not receive it. The devotion itself is really quite simple. One has to go to Mass on the first Friday of the month for nine consecutive months in a state of grace, and receive communion with the implicit intention of doing some kind of reparation for humanity’s indifference to His sacrifice.

Last Friday I went to Mass because I’ve been doing this devotion for five or six months. After church, I ran an errand and got lunch with my mom. While in the car, I turned on Spotify, because tunes, and I was in a spectacularly good mood. I found myself thinking about really random things. Because I was curious, I looked up what percentage of people are left handed, because I’m left handed. So no one reading this has to look it up, it’s about ten percent. I found myself wondering whether Jesus was left or right handed, and I wondered how many people actually take the time to consider that kind of thing. My dad later explained that it’s hard to learn to write with one’s non-dominant hand, but it’s not so hard to learn to do other things so, being a carpenter, Jesus may have been at least somewhat ambidextrous, which I thought was interesting.

As we drove from place to place, I started realizing just how many fences there were. Fences are such a staple part of suburban life that they almost escape our notice, but today, I found myself marveling at the barriers people had constructed between houses and businesses, and along roads. I actually found myself laughing at how territorial it was. It was exactly like dogs marking their territory to me. I just found myself thinking that it seemed a bit primitive in a way. Obviously fences are for our own protection and the protection of others. We have a fence around our yard so a neighbor kid won’t fall into our pool or something, but I think too often, we use them to lock ourselves in and lock others out.

Still, I found myself thinking that people spend too much time building fences, and not enough time breaking down walls. We’re supposed to break down walls. Jesus spent nearly His entire three-year ministry doing that, and He broke down the most impassible wall between humanity and God when He went to the cross. Jesus explained to saint Margaret Mary that when we participate in the First Friday devotion, we’re doing the same thing. He said we stand in the gap between God and those who are indifferent or even scornful toward Him. God chooses us no matter what, but He can’t make us choose Him.

We’re so used to fences, though, that we build walls between ourselves and our Savior. It’s easy to believe that the gap between us and God can’t be breached because He’s perfect, and we’re not, and in this life, never can be. It’s easy to forget that Jesus can do the impossible. It’s sometimes hard to believe that Jesus died for me, and it’s easy to ask the question, now what? It’s easy to ask, am I worth that? It’s easy to doubt it when, in our hearts, we know the answer is, “Yes;” when His answer is, “Yes.” Jesus doesn’t build walls. He breaks them down. He does this in his stories, and in His actions, He doesn’t stop anyone from coming to Him, and He wants us, as He did, to love the least of these.

We have to stand in the gap. We have to love our enemies. We have to have mercy. We have to heal where we can. Jesus is alive in His Church, and standing in the gap isn’t just a metaphor. We can be little bridges. Jesus works miracles in our world today. Maybe we should spend less time agonizing about property lines, and more time actually loving our neighbors.

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