Tag Archives: Surrender

Let It Go

“Your will, not mine be done.” That was what Jesus said to His Father the night before He died. I never fully appreciated what that meant until this afternoon. Being God, Jesus could have saved the world some other, less violent way. Nonetheless, He died for us; He died for me.

I’m going to briefly pause here to explain the difference between God’s perfect will, and God’s permissive will. God’s perfect will is exactly what He wants to happen, and when it applies to humans and our freedom, it’s when what we choose is what He wants. God’s permissive will is what He allows to happen. God does not want bad things to happen. Illness, wars, natural disasters, etc are not part of God’s perfect plan. However, He allows those things to happen because He can take something bad and turn it into a greater good. It was not the Father’s perfect will for Jesus to die on the Cross. He allowed it to happen, however, because He can take the worst thing humanly possible (we killed God), and turn it into the best thing possible (God saves us).

On Monday I had a bit of a tantrum. I had asked for assistance with something (a thing I can’t physically do), and my dad somewhat sarcastically told me to wait. For the record, sarcasm is practically my family’s native language. The issue was ultimately that I would have done it myself had I been able to. My parents, of course, tried to talk me down from crazy, but it didn’t help, so I bolted to my room, and prayed. It was a bit nonsensical for a bit, but finally I got to, “I’m not angry at them (my parents), and I’m not angry at You. I’m just angry at… bad luck, I guess, and I don’t really know what to do with that.”

I sat there with Him for a bit, and neither of us said anything, but after a few minutes (I don’t actually know how long), He gently reminded me of two things. He wasn’t able to carry the Cross Himself; He needed Simon to help Him. He allowed Himself to be needy, and the help wasn’t totally willing. Then He reminded me of His time in the Garden. His friends were willing to help, but were unable to. I have always had willing and able help.

An approach the Catholic Church takes to suffering is to “offer it up.” I can hand over certain sufferings to God for Him to use for His glory and for my good and/or the good of others. How this works, I don’t fully understand, but I can attest that it makes things more bearable. As I said, I’ve been struggling with “dependence” for a while. I simply don’t like it. I tried several times to simply hand it over all at once, but I couldn’t.

I prayed about this most of the day on Monday, and Jesus helped me devise a plan of how to deal with it. He inspired me to write a list of things that piss me off because I can’t do them, and write a list of things I can do. The “I Can’t Do That” list was longer, but what I realized was that the things on the “I Can Do That” list were much more significant. Then we made a deal. I couldn’t hand everything over all at once under the umbrella of “dependence,” so I made a sort of spiritual “Let It Go” box. I made it pretty and put a lock on it, then I handed over the key to the Lord. Yesterday I looked at the “I Can’t Do That” list, and started putting things in the box.

This afternoon, I was finally able to put the last things in the box because I realized something. While I was praying today, Jesus brought me to the moment when He said, “Your will, not mine be done.” Neither Jesus nor His Father wanted things to happen the way they did, but both the Father and the Son allowed the worst possible thing to happen to bring about the best result. God doesn’t want me to have epilepsy or muscular dystrophy, but He’s allowed it to happen. What I didn’t realize is that I have a choice in the matter.

I can choose to be continuously pissed off about it, or I can choose to accept it and do what I can to glorify the God who made me and loves me. When I say “Your will, not mine be done,” what I’m really saying is, “Okay, this happened. Neither of us like it. Moving on.” I know myself well enough to know that if I were “able-bodied” I would have played hockey, I would have been, and still would be into skateboarding, and I’d be a drummer, not a singer.

I also am inclined to think that I wouldn’t know the Lord. That means three things: 1) I wouldn’t have much hope of getting to Heaven, 2) my peeps would have less of a chance of knowing Him, and 3) I would be unhappy. What must be understood is that generally speaking, I am happy. I’m not always in a state of euphoria, but most of the things in my life do bring me joy. What also must be understood is that my faith is what gives me the most joy.

Your will, not mine be done.

Trust Life

We had a death in the family on Saturday. I don’t usually like using names on here, so I’ll refer to him as Vermont. It was completely unexpected. He wasn’t an immediate family member, but he was still someone fairly close. I’m surprised at how hard it hit me. Life is so fragile. Death is a weird thing. Just recently, another family member died, though this person was much older, and I didn’t know him personally. When I think about it, our family is so large, but a number of elderly relatives have died, and even some younger ones. It’s hard to believe I’m never going to see Vermont again. We didn’t see him and his family often, but I liked him. He was friendly and it will be strange having the others come to visit without him.

Death is a strange thing because the show must go on. Life doesn’t often let you stop to grieve; at least not for very long. Tonight I’m hosting a party with some old friends I grew up with. Most of them will probably drink, we’ll all eat food, and we’ll play video games, and do other stupid stuff. At the end of the day, though, somebody died. Sometimes I wonder what it will be like when I die. I don’t want people to be sad because I want them to be sure that I’m going somewhere good. At the same time, though, I’ll be gone and out of their lives until they follow me. I admit, I think about death a fair amount, but I’m not afraid of it. I just wonder what really happens before you reach your final destination.

That’s the other weird thing. Death isn’t really any kind of end. It only looks like one. Vermont is still alive in spirit. He’s just somewhere else. Maybe it’s the not knowing that freaks us out so much. We want to know where our loved ones have gone. Ultimately, we can only have some kind of idea, and depending on our spirituality, these ideas are usually hopeful and good, but they’re still vague at best. From a Christian standpoint, I think death is hard because it involves something that humans tend not to be so good at. It involves trust, and it involves surrender. When a loved one dies, there is literally nothing we can do about it, and if we don’t surrender, we tend to just cause ourselves more pain. We have to surrender ourselves to God’s mercy, and we have to trust God with the soul of the one we love and, for now, have lost.

I often reflect on the fact that the world is not fair, but at the same time I remember that God isn’t either. In this world, we have to die, but God made a way for us to live past death. I trust that.

Because in my world guinea pigs can fly!